Can A Person Request A Conservatorship For Themselves?

Sometimes, when a person loses their ability to manage their own finances, a conservatorship is set up for their protection. This involves a conservator being appointed to control the person’s finances. Such appointments are made by courts during conservatorship proceedings.

How are conservatorship proceedings initiated? Generally, they are initiated by a petition for the appointment of a conservator being filed by a person who has an interest in the welfare, affairs or estate of the person who is no longer able to manage their own finances. However, there are certain situations in which a person who can’t take care of their own finances anymore is allowed to file such a petition themselves.

Here in Kalamazoo County, whether a person can file a petition for a conservatorship for themselves depends on what has caused them to lose the ability to manage their own finances. If their inability to manage their finances comes from a physical infirmity, and they are still mentally competent, they are allowed to file a petition for a conservatorship themselves. If, however, their inability to manage finances is caused by a loss of mental competency, such a petition can generally only be filed by other interested persons.

Conservatorship requests and conservatorship proceedings can often be complex matters in which there are all manner of important little details. Thus, if a person is thinking of making a request for a conservator to be appointed, either for themselves or a loved one, they may want to go to an attorney for advice on the matter and guidance on the process.

Source: Kalamazoo County Government, “CONSERVATORSHIPS OF ADULTS,” Accessed Feb. 23, 2015

Categories:

Email Us For A Free Consultation

    • Please enter your name.
    • This isn't a valid phone number.
    • Please enter your email address.
      This isn't a valid email address.
    • Please make a selection.
    • Please enter a message.
E-mail Disclaimer: Please be advised that contacting Willis Law or one of its attorneys by email does not constitute establishing an attorney-client relationship or otherwise confidential relationship between you and the Firm. Please do not give us any information you regard as confidential until a formal attorney-client relationship has been established. Do you wish to proceed?
Put Us On Your Side