2015's First Half Saw Spike In Fatal Auto Crashes

Recently, the federal government released estimates on fatal vehicle accidents for the first half of 2015. These statistics paint a very different picture of the state of traffic safety in the U.S. than the statistics for 2014 would.

The statistics for 2014 seemed to indicate the U.S. was going in the right direction when it comes to traffic fatalities. The traffic death total that year was down slightly from the previous year. Also, the motor vehicle fatality rate was at a historically low level.

The fatal traffic accident estimates for the first half of 2015, however, indicate that an unfortunate reversal in trends has occurred here in U.S. when it comes to motor vehicle deaths. It appears deadly traffic accidents spiked upward. Specifically, it is estimated that 2015's first half saw an 8.1 percent increase in such accidents.

No definitive explanation has yet been put forward for this reversal in trends.

Why do you think the U.S. saw an increase in fatal crashes the first half of this year? Do you think the year's second half will also be found to be comparatively fatal-auto-accident-heavy? What area of traffic safety would you like to see improvements in in the U.S.?

Fatal traffic accidents can have major consequences on a societal level. They can also deeply affect individuals and families. It is important for individuals and families who have had loved ones taken from them by traffic accidents to know what options the legal system may make available to them regarding seeking justice and financial relief. Traffic accident attorneys can provide such individuals and families with guidance on this area of law.

Source: Detroit Free Press, "Traffic fatalities up 8.1% in first half of 2015," Brent Snavely, Nov. 24, 2015

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