White Collar Crimes Alleged In Private Use Of Charitable Funds

During desperate financial times, it is not uncommon for people to take money unlawfully, and, in many cases, they plan to return it as soon as they can. However, many are caught before they can return it, and those caught are often people with no prior criminal record. Embezzlements are regarded as white collar crimes, meaning that a person is accused of taking property belonging to another for one's own enrichment while in a professional position of trust.

A 51-year-old Michigan man is facing five felony counts of embezzlement of funds raised for a youth baseball team. Michigan Gaming Control Board reports that state rules allow gaming events to be organized to raise funds for charitable organizations. It is stated that the man arranged 32 poker events at a bar from 2012 through 2014, but instead of transferring the funds to the account of the baseball team, he allegedly used it for self-enrichment.

The MGCB alleges the funds were used for a trip to Florida, a vehicle, auto repair bills, telephone bills of his mother and a house payment. At his recent arraignment, he was told that he may not conduct further gaming events until the MGCB is satisfied that he has proper control over the finances. It was reported that a conviction may lead to a jail sentence of up to 10 years.

Michigan residents who are under investigation or have been charged with white collar crimes, such as embezzlement, will likely realize the impact such charges or a conviction can have on their futures. This is not a situation most people can cope with on their own, and everybody is entitled to legal representation. Being charged does not equate to guilt, and an experienced attorney will assess the circumstances and take a proactive approach to protect the rights of an accused individual.

Source: mlive.com, "Man charged with embezzling from youth baseball team in Macomb County", Khalil AlHajal, Aug. 6, 2015

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